Mikee Larrazabal 10 min read

How to Figure out Your Child’s Learning Style

What are the different learning styles and how does it help children’s development?

One of the most important things you can do as a parent is to figure out your child’s learning style. This will help you understand how they learn best and provide them with the tools they need for success in school and beyond.

Each child is unique, so there is no one-size-fits-all approach to learning. However, by understanding your child’s strengths and weaknesses, you can help them thrive in their own way. In this blog, we will be tackling the four main different learning styles and how it helps your child’s development.

There are four types of learning styles.

The VARK learning model, developed by Neil Fleming in the 1980s, identifies four types of learners: auditory, visual, reading/writing-preferred, and kinesthetic. Each type of learner prefers to receive information in a certain way and learns best through specific methods.

Keep in mind that most people use all four types of learning at different times and in different situations. However, one or two usually dominate.

Auditory Learners

Learning Style Auditory

Auditory learners are those who learn best by hearing information. They often struggle with written materials but excel when listening to lectures or discussions. Using auditory cues can help auditory learners process and remember information more effectively.

To support auditory learners, try the following strategies:

• Have your child listen to audiobooks or podcasts instead of reading texts. For example: If they are reading a history book, have them also listen to a related podcast.

• You can also take notes while listening to lectures or discussions such as in class or during family conversations to make learning fun and effective.

• They work best when they study by reading material out loud together and discussing it afterward.

•Songs or rhymes will help them remember and retain information. For example, multiplication tables or the names of the countries in North America.

Visual Learners

Visual learners are those who learn best by seeing the information. They often struggle with auditory materials but excel when they can see pictures, diagrams, and other visuals. Using visual aids can help visual learners process and remember information more effectively.

To support visual learners, try the following strategies:

• Have your child draw pictures or diagrams to help them remember information. For example, they could draw a diagram of the solar system to help them remember the order of the planets.

• Use highlighters or colored pencils to color-code their notes. This is to help them identify important information more easily.

• Help them find infographics or other visual aids online that will help them understand new concepts. For example, an infographic about the water cycle or the food chain.

• Help them study by creating flashcards with pictures or diagrams. For example, they could make flashcards with pictures of different animals and the corresponding classification (mammal, reptile, amphibian, bird, fish).

Reading/Writing-Preferred Learners

Reading/writing-preferred learners are those who learn best by reading and writing information. They often struggle with auditory materials but excel when they can read texts or take notes. Using reading and writing strategies can help reading/writing-preferred learners process and remember information more effectively.

To support reading/writing-preferred learners, try the following strategies:

• Have your child take notes while listening to lectures or discussions. They can also write down key points after reading texts. This will help them process and remember the information more effectively.

• Encourage them to read texts aloud to themselves or you. This will help them notice new information that they might have missed when reading silently.

• Help them find texts that are interesting to them. This will help them engage with the material and make the learning process more enjoyable. A reading/writing-preferred learner once said that “learning is like a good book; if you don’t like the story, you won’t want to read it.”

Kinesthetic Learners

Kinesthetic learners are those who learn best by doing information. They often struggle with auditory or visual materials but excel when they can participate in hands-on activities. Using kinesthetic strategies can help kinetic learners process and remember information more effectively.

To support kinesthetic learners, try the following strategies:

• Have your child participate in hands-on activities whenever possible. For example, if they are learning about plants, have them plant a seed and watch it grow to make learning fun.

Kinetic Learner

• Encourage them to take breaks often to move around and stay active. This will help them stay focused and engaged in the material.

• Help them find ways to incorporate movement into their daily routine, such as walking or running while listening to audiobooks.

• Help them study by creating games or puzzles that require them to use the material they are trying to learn. For example, a multiplication game where they have to solve problems to earn points.

No matter what learning style your child prefers, there are ways to support their development and help them succeed. By understanding their strengths and weaknesses, you can set them up for success in the classroom and beyond.

“Mixed” or “Multiple” Learning Styles

It is important to note that most children do not fit perfectly into one learning style auditory or learning style visual category. In fact, many children display a mix of preferences across all four styles. A kinetic learner might learn best with music! This is what is known as a “multiple” or “mixed” learning style. And that’s okay! The important thing is to identify the dominant learning style(s) and then find ways to support them.

Better Speech consultation

Now that you know a little more about the different types of learners, let’s take a closer look at how learning styles develop in children.

Most researchers believe that learning styles are largely determined by genetics. In other words, people are born with a preference for certain types of information and learn best through specific methods. However, the environment also plays a role in shaping learning styles.

For example, a child who is exposed to a lot of auditory information (such as music or stories) is likely to develop a learning style auditory preference. Similarly, a child who is exposed to a lot of visual information (such as pictures or television) is likely to develop a learning style visual preference.

As children grow older, they often become aware of their own learning preferences and begin to use strategies that work best for them. For example, a child who prefers auditory information may start reading texts out loud to themselves in order to better understand and remember the material.

Another child might say that they “learn best by doing” and prefer to participate in hands-on activities. However, it’s important to keep in mind that children often learn best when they are exposed to a variety of information and experiences.

So, even if your child has a preference for one type of information, don’t be afraid to expose them to other types as well. By doing so, you’ll help them develop a well-rounded learning style that will serve them well throughout their life.

Figure out what learning style your child works best.

Making Learning Fun!

If you’re not sure what type of learner your child is, there are a few ways to find out. One option is to ask their teacher how they seem to learn best in the classroom. Another option is to observe your child at home and look for patterns in the way they play, learn, and explore.

Once you have a better idea of your child’s learning style, you can start using strategies to support their development. For example, if your child is a visual learner, you might want to provide them with plenty of opportunities to look at books, puzzles, and other visual materials.

You can also use learning style assessments to help identify your child’s preferences.

These assessments usually involve having children complete tasks or answer questions while being timed. Based on their performance, the assessor can make recommendations about which type of information and methods are most likely to help your child learn best.

While it’s helpful to know your child’s learning style, it’s important to remember that no one learns in just one way. In fact, most people benefit from using a variety of methods. So, even if your child prefers auditory information, they may still benefit from using visual materials or participating in hands-on activities.

The bottom line is that there is no “right” way to learn. The best way to support your child’s development is to provide them with opportunities to explore, play, and learn in a variety of ways. By doing this, you’ll help them develop the skills they need to succeed in school and in life and make learning fun!

Learning styles are also used in speech therapy

When a child is in speech therapy, the therapist will incorporate all four types such as the learning style auditory, learning style visual, or others into the sessions. This helps to ensure that the child is getting the most out of the therapy and that they are able to learn and remember the information being taught.

For children who are auditory learners, the therapist might use auditory discrimination activities. These activities involve helping the child identify different sounds and understand how they are used in spoken language. Teaching new words through songs or rhymes is also a good way to support auditory learners, as they can process the information better.

Learning Style Auditory

For children who are visual learners, the therapist might use visual aids such as pictures or books. They might also use sign language or gestures to help the child understand the concepts being taught.

For children who are kinaesthetic learners, the therapist might incorporate movement into the activities. For example, kinetic learners might have the child stand up and act out a scene from a book. Or, they might have the child clap their hands each time they hear a particular sound to make learning fun!

For children who learn best through reading and writing, the therapist might use worksheets or other written materials. They might also have the child keep a journal to practice writing skills.

Each child is unique and will learn best in different ways.

The most important thing is that the therapist is able to identify each child’s learning preferences and adjust the activities accordingly. By doing this, they can ensure that the child is getting the most out of the therapy and making progress towards their goals.

Learning Styles for Neurodiversed Children

While all people have a preferred learning style, this is especially true for neurodiverse individuals. This is because neurodiversity refers to the idea that there is a vast range of “normal” brain functions and structures.

Making Learning Fun!

Neurodiverse individuals often prefer one learning style over others, may it be learning style auditory or learning style visual. For example, many autistic people are visual learners. This means that they often prefer to learn through visual aids such as pictures or books.

Other neurodiverse conditions, such as ADHD, can also impact learning preferences. Many people with ADHD are kinetic learners, which means they learn best through movement and hands-on activities.

The bottom line is that it’s important to be aware of your child’s learning style and to provide them with opportunities to learn in the way that works best for them. By doing this, you’ll help them reach their full potential.

Note for Teachers!

Keep in mind that not all students learn in the same way. In fact, most students benefit from using a variety of methods. So, even if your child prefers auditory information, they may still benefit from using visual materials or participating in hands-on activities.

We can’t judge the excellence of the child based on their learning style. Some of the great scientists, mathematicians, and historical figures learned auditory while others were visual learners. The best way to support your student’s development is to make learning fun! Provide them with opportunities to explore, play, and learn in a variety of ways.

What is your preferred learning style? auditory, visual, kinaesthetic, or reading/writing? How do you think this impacts your life? Let us know in the comments!