Mikee Larrazabal 6 min read

The Benefits of Speech Therapy for Late Talkers

Children develop at different paces. However, there are general milestones that most children reach by a certain age. One of these milestones is speech development. If you think your child is a late talker and needs help, the recommendation for speech therapy is not something that you should hesitate about! It does more good than harm! To learn more about late talkers, read more!

It’s one of the most wonderful moments parents may experience when their child speaks for the first time. It is also a significant step in your child’s development and growth. However, when a toddler manifests symptoms of speech and vocabulary limitations, it becomes a worry for parents. Normal speech and language development include:

Late Talker

At the end of 3 months:

  • Smile at you
  • Make cooing sounds
  • When spoken to, they might get quiet or smile
  • Seem as though they recognize a parent’s voice
  • Make different crying sounds for different needs

By the end of 6 months:

  • Make gurgling sounds
  • Babble or make other sounds
  • Use their voice to show pleasure/displeasure
  • Look in the direction of sounds
  • Respond to changes in tone of voice from an adult
  • Pay attention to sounds made by objects/toys/music

At the end of 12 months:

  • Attempt to imitate speech sounds
  • Say simple words like “dada,” “mama”
  • Respond to simple directions, such as “Come here”
  • Recognize common items, like “doggie”
  • Look in the direction of sounds

By the end of 18 months:

  • Know the names of known people, objects, and body parts
  • Follow simple directions
  • Say 10 words

At the end of 24 months:

  • Use simple 2-word phrases like “more juice”
  • As one or two-word questions like “Go bye-bye?”
  • Follow simple questions and understand simple questions
  • Say about 50 or more words
  • Speech is understood by parents/primary caregivers at least half of the time

What is a late talker and what are the signs that your child may be one

A late talker is a child who has delayed speech and language development. At the age of 18 months, most children have about a 50-word vocabulary. But a late talker has a vocabulary of fewer than 50 words. They also start to put words together much later than other kids their age.

According to The Hanen Centre, a late talker is a kid between 18 and 30 months with adequate language comprehension and average development in other areas (hearing, vision, motor, and cognitive skills) who nevertheless has a limited spoken vocabulary compared to peers for their age. Some children are able to catch up on their own; others are not.

There are several signs that may indicate your child is a late talker:

  • Your child isn’t saying any words by his first birthday
  • He/she has a very limited vocabulary even at 18 months old
  • Your child uses single words only and has difficulty putting words together to form sentences
  • Your child’s speech is difficult to understand, even for close family members

Denial makes it hard for parents to accept that their child has a problem. Follow your gut and listen to the red flags. The earlier you catch it, the better. If left untreated, speech and language problems can lead to difficulties in school, both academically and socially.

Risk Factors of Children who do not outgrow late talking

Late talkers are at risk of having long-term language difficulties if they don’t receive help. Research indicates that as many as 50% of late talkers will have persistent language difficulties, and up to 20% will have significant problems such as dyslexia, ADHD, and Tourette syndrome.

Risk factors have been identified to help determine if a child is likely to have continuing language problems. These factors make it easier to understand if a child is a late talker who does not outgrow it on their own. Risk factors include:

  • quiet as an infant; little babbling
  • a history of ear infections
  • a limited number of consonant sounds (eg. p, b, m, t, d, n, y, k, g, etc.)
  • does not link pretend ideas and actions together while playing
  • does not imitate (copy) words
  • uses mostly nouns (names of people, places, things), and few verbs (action words)
  • difficulty playing with peers (social skills)
  • a family history of communication delay, learning or academic difficulties
  • a mild comprehension (understanding) delay for his or her age
  • uses few gestures to communicate
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How to get help if you think your child is a late talker

If you think your child may be a late talker, the best thing to do is to seek professional help. A speech-language pathologist (SLP) can assess your child’s development and provide you with guidance on how to best support your child’s communication skills. The earlier a child receives speech therapy, the better. Speech therapy can help late talkers develop the language skills they need to communicate effectively. These problems include:

  • Speech sounds (enunciation)
  • Language (expressive, receptive (auditory))
  • Literacy and its connection to Language
  • Social communication
  • Voice
  • Fluency
  • Cognitive communication
  • Feeding and swallowing

If your child is a late talker, don’t wait for him or her to “outgrow” the problem. Research has shown that children who receive speech therapy early on are more likely to catch up to their peers and have better long-term outcomes.

The benefits of early intervention for children who are late talkers

New researches show that the earlier a child with language difficulties is identified and receives intervention, the better that child’s outcomes will be. Early intervention means giving help and support as soon as possible after a problem is identified. It can make a big difference in the lives of children with speech and language problems.

Late Talkers

The earlier a child receives speech therapy, the better. Speech therapy can help late talkers develop the language skills they need to communicate effectively. If children are delayed, it is best to refer them to a speech-language pathologist or seek other professional help as soon as possible.

Benefits of Speech Therapy for Late Talkers include:

  • Developing the ability to communicate their needs and wants
  • Increasing their vocabulary
  • Improving their pronunciation
  • Helping them to understand what others are saying
  • Teaching them how to have a conversation
  • Improving their social skills
  • Increasing their confidence and self-esteem.

If you think your child may be a late talker, don’t wait to seek help. The sooner you get started on speech therapy, the better the chance of success.

Frequently Asked Questions about Late Talker vs Speech Delay

To assist you to check for warning symptoms and locate the finest support for a late talker, we’ve compiled the most Frequently Asked Questions about Late Talker vs Speech Delay below.

How common is late talking?

Late talking is more common than most people realize. It affects approximately 5% of children between the ages of 18 and 30 months. Boys are four times more likely to be late talkers than girls.

Late Talker vs Speech Delay

What causes late talking?

The exact cause of late talking is unknown, but it is believed to be due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors.

Is there a difference between a late talker vs speech delay?

A late talker is a child who is not yet using a speech at the same level as other children his or her age. A child with a late talker vsspeech delay has difficulty producing certain sounds, which can make it hard for people to understand him or her.

What are the consequences of late talking?

If left untreated, late talking can lead to long-term difficulties with communication, social skills, and academic achievement.

How is late talking diagnosed?

Late talking is usually diagnosed by a speech-language pathologist (SLP) after conducting a comprehensive assessment.

What are the treatment options for late talking?

The most effective treatment for late talking is speech therapy. A trained SLP can help your child develop the skills he or she needs to communicate effectively.

If you are concerned about your child’s language development, it is important to seek professional help. An SLP can assess your child’s development and provide you with guidance on how to best support your child’s communication skills. The earlier a child receives speech therapy, the better. Contact us now!